COVID-19 Vaccine | The Center for Children and Women

COVID-19 Vaccine

January 13, 2021

At The Center for Children and Women, the safety and health of our patients are our top priority. We are proud to be your choice for care and thank you for being part of our Texas Children’s family.

We have started our plans to begin vaccinating our patients against COVID-19. Currently, the Pfizer vaccine is approved for people age 16 and older and the Moderna vaccine is approved for those 18 and older. At this time, the State has approved vaccines for specific groups of people who have a higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19. As vaccine quantities grow, we expect vaccinations to include more groups.

We will get in touch with eligible patients once we receive more information on the COVID-19 vaccine availability and administration processes.

Please continue to be safe during the pandemic: wear a mask, wash your hands often, social distance, stay home if you are sick and avoid large crowds.

See below for a list of frequently asked questions. The information about COVID-19 changes quickly and this page will be updated with the latest information

Please sign in to your MyChart account to ensure your information is current so we can reach you quickly. If you do not have a MyChart account, please call 877-361-0111 Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is the COVID-19 vaccine a covered benefit under CHIP/Medicaid?

  • Yes, it is.

How can my child receive the vaccine?

  • If your child is eligible to get the vaccine, we will contact eligible patients to schedule an appointment once we receive more information on the COVID-19 vaccine availability and administration processes.

Which vaccine are you administering to patients?

  • Currently, we will administer both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. Vaccines are allocated by the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) and patients will receive one of these two products.

As a parent or caretaker, will I also be eligible to receive the vaccine at Texas Children’s?

  • Currently, we will only administer the vaccine to our patients who meet the State’s vaccination criteria.

Can my child’s siblings also receive the vaccine at Texas Children’s?

  • Currently, we will only administer the vaccine to our patients who meet the State’s vaccination criteria.

Can my child receive the vaccine if they have symptoms of COVID-19?

  • If your child has symptoms of COVID-19 or is currently considered a close contact of someone with COVID-19, vaccination should be delayed until they have recovered from their illness and criteria is met for them to discontinue isolation.

Should my child receive the vaccine if they have already had COVID-19?

  • Yes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages vaccination regardless of history of prior symptomatic or asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection.

When will children younger than 16 be able to receive the vaccine?

  • At this time, the Pfizer vaccine is only approved for people age 16 and older and the Moderna vaccine is approved for those 18 and older, as the early clinical trials did not include children and younger teens. We are hopeful children and younger teens will be eligible in the future once additional safety and efficacy data is available.

Which vaccines are currently available?

  • There are currently two vaccines whose manufacturers have received authorization from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the U.S. for emergency use. The first, produced by Pfizer and BioNTech, is authorized for people age 16 and older. The second, produced by Moderna, is authorized for those 18 and older.

What is in the vaccines?

  • Both vaccines use messenger RNA (mRNA) packaged inside lipid nanoparticles to teach the immune system how to generate antibodies against one of the proteins on the surface of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, so the virus can’t enter your cells. This technology has been used before to develop vaccines against SARS, which is how the manufacturers were able to develop and move these vaccine candidates into clinical trials so quickly.

Do the vaccines work?

  • Efficacy of two doses of the Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine is 95%. This means, in clinical trials, the vaccine prevented approximately 95% of COVID-19 disease in people who were vaccinated, and only approximately 5% of vaccinated people developed COVID-19 disease. Additionally, efficacy of two doses of the Moderna vaccine is 94.1%.

Are they safe?

  • From preliminary data, we know mild side effects are common. We know if you’re vaccinated, you should expect to experience some side effects, particularly after the second dose. These side effects are common and may occur after any vaccine. Although uncomfortable, these side effects are a sign that your immune system is responding to the vaccine and is learning to recognize the virus for the future. The short-term safety of these vaccines is clear.

Can a COVID-19 vaccine make me sick with COVID-19?

  • No. The vaccine only contains the genetic instructions to make a protein of the virus. It does not contain a whole virus that can replicate inside of your body. So, the vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19.

How long will the vaccines work?

  • We don’t know yet. As clinical trials progress, we’ll know more about how long immunity lasts and if booster doses will be necessary. Please remain vigilant to the practices which have proven successful throughout the pandemic – wear a mask in all settings, wash your hands frequently, maintain social distancing and avoid large social gatherings.

What can I do if my child is not feeling well?

  • If your child is experiencing a cough or fever, or if you have questions about COVID-19, please call The Center for Children and Women at 832-828-1005 or see our webpage here.

Does the COVID-19 vaccine affect fertility?

No. COVID-19 vaccines do not contain live virus, so the American Society for Reproductive Medicine says the vaccine is not thought to cause an increased risk of infertility, miscarriage, stillbirth or birth defects.

Misleading information on social media suggests the vaccine could cause an immune response to a spike protein on the COVID-19 virus’ surface, and this immune response could also attack similar proteins that make up the placenta. This incorrect information leads people to think this decreases fertility in women. Experts say the coronavirus spike and placental protein have almost nothing in common, making the vaccine very unlikely to trigger a reaction. There is no evidence that mRNA vaccines, including the COVID-19 vaccine, cause the body to produce proteins that attack the placenta.

Also, Moderna presented early study information that showed no poor effects in animals on female reproduction, fetal or embryonic development or postnatal development.

While it may be possible for men who have COVID-19 to experience worsening underlying cardiovascular conditions, which could increase the risk of erectile dysfunction, more research in this area is needed. Since the COVID-19 vaccine cannot make you sick with COVID-19, it cannot cause erectile dysfunction in males.

What can I do if my child is not feeling well?

Does the COVID-19 vaccine affect fertility?

  • This is unknown at this time. However, as summarized above, it is felt that the benefits to the vaccine outweigh any possible small and still theoretical risks.

What if I am nursing? Can the virus be transmitted to my infant or toddler through the vaccine?

  • Because the vaccine does not contain a live virus, there is no virus to transmit with nursing.

Is there an increased miscarriage rate and/or risk?

  • This is unknown at this time. However, it is felt that the benefits to the vaccine outweigh any possible small and still theoretical risks. In the Pfizer trial, the only women suffering miscarriage were in the placebo group. However, the data is simply not robust enough to make any conclusions.

Blogs


Additional resources


In the News


Videos